Even though it was just a temporary fix before an all-new model, the Boxtser, came along, Porsche made sure that the 968 wouldn’t disappear with a mere whimper. No, it was so good that many consider it the best front-engined four-cylinder production Porsche ever.

It might have resembled the 944 (the doors, roof and tailgate being carried over...) but it was 80 per cent new. You could tell it apart from its pop-up headlights, 16in five-spoke ‘Cup’ style alloys, rounded single-lens taillight, updated ‘B’ pillar and rear quarter window. Designed by Harm Lagaay, the rear-wheel drive three-door liftback was powered by a 236bhp 3.0-litre with 304Nm of torque. It could be mated to either a six-speed manual or four-speed automatic and had a 50:50 weight distribution (the transmission was fitted ahead of the rear axle) and offered very good performance. According to Porsche, it had the first naturally aspirated engine to make 101.7Nm of torque per litre and when fitted with the row your own, it could hit the 100kph mark from rest in 6.3 seconds (the slush box added a second and a half to that). It handled really well, too, thanks to a MacPherson strut front suspension (with aluminium alloy lower control arms) and independent rear suspension (with semi-trailing arms and transverse torsion bars), plus stiffer springs and thicker anti-roll bars. Stopping power came from internally vented brake discs with four-piston Brembo calipers. The steering would communicate front-end grip perfectly and even though it was highly capable on both the road and the track, it was also ideal for long leisurely cruises, what with all sorts of kit packed into the sporty cabin including a six-speaker sound system, climate control air conditioning, power adjustable leather seats, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, power windows and power mirrors.

Built from 1992 to 1995 (it spelled the end of a line that started almost 20 years earlier with the 924), and available as a Coupé and Cabriolet (a Club Sport and two turbocharged variants, the “S” and “RS” performance models also came along), just 12,500 units were produced, which makes the 968 very rare. As a result, you have to pay around Dh100,000 for a well-maintained, low mileage model. Worth every penny for what Porschephiles think of this one alone...