It has been over four decades since Triumph broke with tradition and launched a wedge-shaped sportscar claiming it’d be the ‘shape of things to come’ — ironically, the shape of the new TR7 was its biggest flaw...

When viewed from the front, it seemed to have a lot going for it and remains surprisingly contemporary today what with the plunging bonnet line, neatly integrated bumper, gently flared wings and (sometimes) pop-up headlights. However, the rear end was, erm ‘interesting’ to say the least...

From the abruptly cut roof, flat rear window, odd boot lid, weird taillights and huge bumper, the general consensus of opinion about the car was that it was plain and simply ugly.

It did have some merits though; the interior was comfortable (making for a real contrast to the shabby cabins of TRs past) and it also displayed good road holding ability.

But, it lacked power (a 2.0-litre eight-valve unit mounted inline sent 105 horses to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual or three-speed automatic) and it was riddled with quality issues which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone because this was, after all, a British Leyland product. Oil pressure and low coolant level lights were not unfamiliar sights for owners. It is arguably the least desirable TR mostly because of its strange aesthetics (they epitomised the often extreme design of cars from the Seventies) and although plenty were built (112,368 hardtops and 28,864 roadsters) most would have rotted away by now what with rust being another major issue...

 

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