Chrysler 200

This was expected to play a big part in Chrysler’s turnaround from bankruptcy in 2010 after the brand entered into a partnership with Fiat SpA. It got a 90-second Super Bowl commercial starring rapper Eminem and initially sales started well, but then slowed right down, falling 65 per cent of 2015’s pace. And with the rise in demand of SUVs/CUVs, the decision to kill the model off was made. We drove the car and thought it was decent, and with bit more refinement it could have been really good. Maybe in another life…

Aston DB9

It remained in production for 13 years and though the exterior of the Aston was still jaw-dropping, its bones had grown old. It underpinned the DBS, Virage, Vanquish, V8 and V12 Vantage, and Rapide, but couldn’t keep up with newer luxurious sportscars. The new DB11 will carry the mantle now but the DB9, which debuted in 2003, will always be remembered as the model that kept Aston afloat after a troublesome Eighties and Nineties.

Mini Paceman/Roadster/Coupé

It was an ultra-niche body style and it simply didn’t take off as Mini hoped, so, this year marks the end of the Paceman. And the Roadster. Er, and the Coupé. Blimey, how many body styles have they got? Clearly too many because these three were the least popular. The Countryman works because it has size on its side (everyone wants SUVs/CUVs these days) and these three little two-doors are biting the bullet. The Coupé, launched at the Nürburgring, had a go-kart feeling and was fun to drive, and out of the three it’s the one we’ll miss the most. The oddball Roadster and Paceman? Hankies not needed…

Dodge Viper

Production began in 1992 and for around 25 years, it wowed enthusiasts with its sheer, brute power. It was updated three times (1996, 2003, and 2008) then died in 2010 (Chrysler’s bankruptcy didn’t just affect the 200…), but it made a sensational return in 2013. It’s been slow-selling, though, and it leaves the supercar world in a glorious haze of tyre smoke and the roar of that V10…