Chevrolet is amongst the top car manufacturers in the world and has given us some real gems since it was founded in 1911. The Bel Air. Impala. Corvette. Chevelle. Camaro. El Camino. With the current lineup including the likes of the rugged Silverado and high-tech Bolt it is no wonder buyers continue to flock to the gold bowtie. When Chevy is good, it’s very good — but when Chevy is bad, it’s downright awful! In the game for well over 100 years, it hasn’t just been sunshine and rainbows for the American automobile division of General Motors — it is responsible for a long list of truly disastrous vehicles too. They clearly didn’t know what they were doing when putting them into production...

Let’s ignore the obvious mistakes it’s made in the past such as the too dangerous to even drive Corvair (thanks to its infamous swing-axle independent rear suspension), the rusty when new Vega, the cheap as chips Chevette (it only had one speaker...) or the Citation (one of the most recalled vehicle ever) and jump to a more obscure model, the 1923 Series-C Copper Cooled which was meant to be a revolutionary invention but in fact turned out to be so bad that it almost killed the brand. Created by Charles F. Kettering, an air-cooled engine was a tempting prospect back in the Twenties as it would ditch the complex radiator system — though the tech was limited to more expensive cars such as the Franklin. The Copper Cooled was also said to be more affordable and far better than the water-cooled and mainstream Chevy 490 but Kettering was too keen to see his idea come to fruition, pushing the four-pot motor through prematurely, and as a result it was full of problems. It would lose power, overheat and in some cases, blow up! 500 were built and just 100 sold but when they started going wrong, Chevy bought them all back and destroyed them.

Only two are known to survive today and although they made another air-cooled car in the Sixties — the afforementioned Corvair — it was also shelved due to its own problematic reputation which ironically had nothing to do with the reliability of the motor...