Although it’s only been a few months since Ferrari introduced the F8 Tributo coupe at the 2019 Geneva motor show, Maranello has welcomed a new member to the family in the shape of the new F8 Spider. Replacing the 488 Pista Spider in the lineup, it is blessed with a twin-turbo V8 which it shares with the hardtop and has several improvements over the outgoing model to ensure it is as hardcore as can be. That means two things: the McLaren 720S Spider has better watch out and you better make sure you glue that wig down…

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The F8 Spider produces a whopping 710 horses from its mid-rear engine 3.9-litre motor (coupled to a seven-speed dual-clutch F1 transmission) and it benefits from a lighter crankshaft, flywheel, and connecting rods. In fact, it weighs 20kg less than the 488 Spider’s motor. It also gets lighter exhaust manifolds and reaches 710 horses at a screaming 7,000rpm while torque peaks at 770Nm at 3,250rpm. That’s 50 horses and 10Nm more than the 488 Pista Spider. It also does the 0-100kph sprint in 2.9 seconds (a tenth of a second quicker than the model it supersedes) and it has a top speed of 340kph – 15kph more than the outgoing car.

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The exterior features sharp LED headlights which have been designed to highlight the F8’s prominent S-duct, and it also gets large air intakes on its rear haunches along with a subtle rear spoiler.

And what about that new retractable hard top? Well, it can be deployed in 12 seconds and at speeds of 45kph and with it dropped, it stores itself below a tonneau cover on top of the V8 and two buttresses rise to peaks behind the driver and passenger seatbacks. It won’t be the only convertible Ferrari coming this month as the 812 Superfast will also lose its roof very soon. The F8’s new top does however add 20kg in weight over the F8 Tributo but the revised bodywork improves aero by 10 per cent.

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The interior packs a 7.0in touchscreen display (mounted in front of the passenger seat) while the driver's display shows you all manners of info but there’s still a classic gauge cluster with a center-mounted tach. And as for tech, it gets all sorts of goodies from the Ferrari Dynamic Enhancer + (it uses brake vectoring to increase control as the driver exits a corner) and Ferrari’s Side Slip Control system (designed to help drivers maintain control of the car if the rear end steps out).

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It’s the latest addition to a prestigious bloodline of open-top V8 Ferraris which started back in 1977 with the gorgeous 308 GTS.